Архив метки: Nobel

За гранью дисциплин – Found in Translation

Three Skoltech students have taken on a challenge to translate a scientific movie from English to Russian. The film, titled “Beyond Discipline”, is now screened all across Russia as part of the FANK festival of contemporary feature-length scientific films.

“Beyond Discipline” is a project of scientific group of Edinburgh University (Scotland), in which they try to discuss the importance and benefits of interdisciplinary work in science. The film is following the project through a series of interviews with the most interesting representatives of science, education and art of Edinburgh. Two key guests are featured in the film – Peter Higgs, a theoretical physicist, the 2013 Nobel Prize Winner, and Richard Morris, a neurobiologist, the 2016 Brain Prize Winner. The film shows all aspects of interdisciplinarity including positives outcomes as well existing problems and demonstrates a significant demand on interdisciplinary projects for solution of huge modern problems with which humanity faces.

The film was made by Paul Maguire and Sasha Kangasky. Kagansky contacted his friend Anton Krotov, a Skoltech biomed student, and offered him to translate the film for the occasion of the FANK festival. Krotov jumped on the offer and recruited his colleagues Artem Baranovskii and Yulia Mitina, who gladly accepted the challenge.

Anton Krotov told us about the process:

“Sasha (Kagansky) offered me to work on the film together, because last year we already worked on the organization of “Future of Biomedicine 2015” conference in Vladivostok, with participation of invited scientists from Edinburgh University.

“Before I decided to get the work, I watched the film and it seemed pretty interesting to me, with a lot of interesting invited guests for interviews. Not every day you have an opportunity to translate a new film with Peter Higgs, Nobel Prize Winner in physics, have you?  I also thought that to do this job will be good practice in English learning.

“At first, we transcribed all talks to English subtitles and only then we translated it to Russian. The process was interesting but not easy, because this is a documentary film.  You do not find actions of actors but talks with real people, which sometimes express their thoughts in indirect ways. Nevertheless, it was good exercise for us on how to recognize Scottish accent in speeches of interviewees”.

Apart from the process of translation, we asked Anton to relate to the content of the film, and explain why people, especially Skoltech students, should watch the film. “”Beyond discipline” discusses the role of interdisciplinarity in our world and there are several good examples of the perfect application of interdisciplinarity for solutions of some big problems”, he replies, “The filmmakers try to convince you that if you want solve a problem, you should go out from your discipline and meet and work with other people from different fields. I suppose that interdisciplinarity is the one of the key features which education at Skoltech tries to provide. This film is a good example that this feature is really important for accomplishment of success in your work. Some talks in “Beyond discipline” can inspire you to go out of your area of knowledge and try to do something new, something interdisciplinary.

“I hope that in future we could collaborate more with any scientific filmmakers, because it is a good type of projects related with building a relationship between science and art. I am sure that Skoltech students can be interested in such interaction as well as different artists, filmmakers and other specialists. And Skoltech could become a perfect platform for any interdisciplinary projects where science, art and other field can work together”.

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine is awarded for Parasite-Fighting Therapies

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2015 has been awarded for the development of new treatments for parasitic diseases, including malaria, as was announced Monday in Stockholm by the Nobel Committee at the Karolinska Medical Institute. William С. Campbell, Satoshi Omura and Youyou Tu have been awarded the prize. Campbell works at Drew University (Madison, USA), Omura at Kitasato University (Japan). They are honored for their discoveries that allowed to treat diseases caused by roundworms and hookworms.

Beijing based Professor Youyou Tu worked for many years in the field of pharmacology and traditional Chinese medicine. According to RIA Novosti, for several years Youyou Tu was leading the group, which managed to supplement the available drugs for the treatment of malaria with another one artemisinin. This medication is recommended today by the World Health Organization to treat malaria.

Professor Konstantin Severinov: “The current Ebola outbreak is unusual because of its scale."

Prof. Konstantin Severinov

‘The Nobel Сcommittee has made a remarkable choice’, – says Prof. Konstantin Severinov, Director, Skoltech Center for Data-Intensive Biotechnology and Biomedicine. –  The classical microbiological works’ that led to the discovery of new drugs are awarded the Nobel prize’.

‘Until now, the Nobel Prize in Medicine has been awarded for research, addressed in the future, but in some cases this potential has not been realized. This time the award was given for significant and visible results that help millions of people in countries where parasitic diseases continue to steal a large number of human lives’.

Work by Mr. Campbell and Mr. Omura is carried out in the good old-fashioned way: a huge portion of soil bacteria was screened to find those specimen that produce substances that kill worms. They were characterized and studied.

‘Youyou Tu took a similar way, but as a source of potential antibacterial agents she used plants that have long been used in Chinese folk medicine. Youyou Tu was able to identify a substance that turned out to be a very good agent against malaria. Malaria remains to be the most feared disease for mankind, and until recently the only cure for it was quinine, used for centuries’, – states Professor Severinov.

“The Beauty of the Moment When You Create Something”. Nobel Laureate talks Inspiration, Education, Science – and Snoopy

Professor Harry Kroto giving a guest lecture at Skoltech

Professor Harry Kroto giving a guest lecture at Skoltech

“That moment when children realize they’ve created something, that moment…”, Nobel laureate Harry Kroto paused mid-sentence, “there really is nothing like it”. There was a brief silence, then the audience realized this was the final statement from Skoltech’s guest lecturer. Then came the applause, the smiles and a procession of audience members. They waited for their turn to chat with the chemist who received a Nobel for the discovery of Buckminsterfullerene, a carbon-made sphere which resembles a soccer ball. Kroto fondly refers to it as Buckyball.

But it’s a different kind of simple natural beauty that energizes and enchants the 74 year old man: young people’s ability to be curious and creative. He now devotes his life to what he calls “the triple educational revolution of the Goo-You-Wiki World”, the title of his guest seminar at Skoltech. Kroto sees a world where Google, YouTube and Wikipedia open up a new range of possibilities for teachers and students.

To illustrate his point about the effectiveness of online education tools such as GEOSET, the Florida State University professor recruited a dream line up. Copernicus, Galileo, Picasso, Darwin and Snoopy were all feted in front of a full house at the Skoltech auditorium.

There were also objects. One of them was a camera rescued from Berlin just before the Second World War. “It used to be hard work to take a picture, you had to understand the mechanism and the chemistry”, said Kroto, “nowadays kids don’t know what’s going in and on a smart phone camera – but they also don’t care. We need to bring back the curiosity.

“The ethical purpose of education involves teaching young people how they can decide for themselves what is true or false. Does preying work as well as your mobile phone?” He smiled, then became serious again. “Penicillin was a miracle but now antibiotics-resistant bacteria pose a grave threat. But how do we convey this intriguing complexity?

Nobel laureate Kroto at the Skoltech seminar

Nobel laureate Kroto at the Skoltech seminar

Here is the real question: how can you make a difference as an educator?”

Kroto began addressing these issues when he participated as a guest on TV and radio programs. Then came the Algebra workshops he conducts with six-year-old students. And now it is time, he believes, to embrace distant online learning and tutoring. “By using online tools my team and I have revolutionized resumes and assessments. GEOSET turns it all into an enjoyable experience. After universities and employees see our students’ presentations, they say things like ‘we can see that you can teach’ or ‘we enjoyed your presentation’. We’re providing young students with a technological platform that they can contribute to. We’ve created local branches in countries like Japan, USA, and Brazil, and hopefully Russia. We send links to funding agencies instead of long documents. Nobody reads your reports but they will click on a link to a two minute presentation.”

He took another pause. “This is what I call a revolution”

 

A member of the audience wanted to know how come Kroto uses humor so often, but fails to mention it directly in his presentation.

“I have three religions”, he replied, “Amnesty international, atheism – and humor. Does that answer your question?”

Harry Kroto: inspired by Snoopy, Copernicus and Darwin

Harry Kroto: inspired by Snoopy, Copernicus and Darwin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A full house at the Skoltech auditorium. The  Harold Kroto guest seminar was organized by Mikhail Myagkov, Skoltech's Vice-President for Academic Affairs and International Relations

A full house at the Skoltech auditorium. The Harold Kroto guest seminar was organized by Mikhail Myagkov,
Skoltech’s Vice-President for Academic Affairs and International Relations

* The Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) is a private graduate research university in Skolkovo, Russia, a suburb of Moscow. Established in 2011 in collaboration with MIT, Skoltech educates global leaders in innovation, advances scientific knowledge, and fosters new technologies to address critical issues facing Russia and the world. Applying international research and educational models, the university integrates the best Russian scientific traditions with twenty-first century entrepreneurship and innovation.

Guest Lecture by Nobel Laureate Harry Kroto: How Do You Goo – the Educational Revolution of Online Learning

Yes, they are actually curious about science. Image Couretsy of Margaret Kroto

Yes, they are actually curious about science. Image Couretsy of Margaret Kroto

It is not every day that you meet a Nobel laureate in chemistry who calls himself Harry, rather than Professor Kroto or Sir Harold. But this guest speaker, slated to give a Skoltech seminar on July 15, is different. Perhaps it’s because he focuses not on his own credentials but on future generations. Harry Kroto deals with new ways of tapping into young people’s creativity, in an ever-changing landscape of webinars, online courses, and seemingly endless knowledge. Harry Kroto cares about young people living in what he calls the GooYouWiki World – and their brains.

Seminar Title: “The Educational Revolution and the Goo-You-Wiki World”

When: July 15th, 12 PM

Where: Beijing-1 Auditorium, China cluster Skolkovo School of Management

Further details and info: buldina@skolkovotech.ru

Seminar Abstract

The aim of education is to uncap the creative potential of every child and we now have a new device which promises to help us do better than before. The Internet has initiated the second great revolution in education; the first was initiated by the printing press. The GooYouWiki World not only makes information almost instantaneously locatable and accessible today, but it also enables anyone with expertise and the passion to communicate to contribute to the amazing globally-accessible cache of knowledge.

On-line education is of course invaluable for students who are unable to attend a university physically but it is not clear that the simple repackaging of courses utilizes the new technology to its full potential. For instance the traditional teacher-student dynamics is basically no different on-line from what it was before and certainly the close personal teacher-student interaction, often so crucial in successful education relationships, is lost. We should thus also explore the new imaginative educational approaches which this technology offers for instance to conflate synergistically with, rather than replace, traditional ones.

A first initiative in the UK, www.vega.org.uk, is now a fantastic archive of recordings by outstanding scientists and its spin-off is the Global Educational Outreach for Science, Engineering and Technology (GEOSET) initiative (www.geoset.info) which is aimed at capturing the ingenuity of teachers to explain specific topics which can be used by other teachers elsewhere on the planet.

It also enables students to contribute creatively to the great humanitarian endeavor of building the “Global Cache of Knowledge” and at the same time improve greatly their career prospects. GEOSET turns the dynamics of the teaching process round by 180 degrees and focuses on the educator capturing what the teacher wants to teach.

Our new related initiative is assembling Teacher’s Tricks of The Trade, focused nuggets of teaching genius to be streamed from the new www.TToTTs.com website for other teachers to employ in their own lessons and lectures.

Prof. Sir Harold Kroto, Nobel Laureate (1996), Chemistry

Prof. Sir Harold Kroto, Nobel Laureate (1996), Chemistry

Speaker Introduction

Professor Sir Harold Kroto FRS, was knighted in 1996 for contributions to chemistry and later that year, together with Robert Curl and Richard Smalley (of Rice University, Houston, Texas), received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for the discovery of C60 Buckminsterfullerene – a new form of carbon. Fellow of the Royal Society (1990), Foreign Associate of the National Academy of Sciences (US), President of the Royal Society of Chemistry (2002-2004). Longstaff Medal of the Royal Society of Chemistry (1993), Faraday Lecturer 2001 (Royal Society), Copley Medal of the Royal Society (2002), Erasmus Medal of Academia Europaea, Freeman of the City of Torino, 29 Hon Degrees.

 

 

 

 

 

The Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) is a private graduate research university in Skolkovo, Russia, a suburb of Moscow. Established in 2011 in collaboration with MIT, Skoltech educates global leaders in innovation, advances scientific knowledge, and fosters new technologies to address critical issues facing Russia and the world. Applying international research and educational models, the university integrates the best Russian scientific traditions with twenty-first century entrepreneurship and innovation.

Skoltech Biomed Conference, May 26-28: Towards Therapies of the Future

* American and Japanese Nobel laureates in medicine will give keynote speeches to kick-off Skoltech’s biomedical research centers

* Leading researchers from across the world are slated to get together for an international conference on life saving stem-cell therapies

Participants from Russia, The United States, Holland and Japan will take part in the inaugural “Towards Therapies of the Future” conference and kick-off the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology’s (Skoltech) Centers for Research, Education and Innovation (CREIs) for Stem Cell Research and Innovative Biomedical Therapies (RNAi  Therapeutics & Infectious Diseases). World-class leaders in these fields will report on recent and future developments and discuss their impact on  future healthcare.

Nobel laureate (2012, Medicine) Shinya Yamanka

Nobel laureate (2012, medicine) Shinya Yamanaka. Image courtesy ucsf.edu

The keynote speakers for the conference are Nobel Laureates Phillip Sharp (1993) and Shinya Yamanaka (2012), along with presentations from world leading scientists in Stem Cells, RNAi and Infectious Diseases. The conference will provide an opportunity to explore the scope and the science of Skoltech’s biomedical centers, led by professors Anton Berns and  Victor Kotelianski.

Expert participants will discuss opportunities for relevant and high-potential research in the Russian and international context and to provide an occasion for participants to share their scientific insights. They will address groundbreaking science which, for example, transforms simple skin cells into all-purpose “magic” stem cells. Such stem cells could help treat head and spine injuries, various types of cancer, cardiovascular disease and immune system malfunctions – and ultimately save millions of lives.  Also on the agenda: RNA therapy’s potential for revolutionizing the treatment of complex diseases by “silencing” harmful genes.

 

Nobel Laureate Phillip A Sharp (1993, medicine)

Nobel Laureate Phillip A Sharp (1993, medicine). Image courtesy purdue.edu

The Nobel laureates are also slated to evaluate dozens of Skoltech students’ tech projects. Using poster presentations, the young Russian researchers will have a rare chance to receive recognition from the brightest minds on the planet.

Professor Yamanaka has recently pointed out the pressing need for international cooperation: “I hope that many Russian researchers would contribute to the research of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPS), help develop the technology, and bring iPS cell-based therapies to the bedside as quickly as possible.”

For more information on schedule and transportation to Skolkovo Innovation Center’s Hypercube please visit this page:

https://www.skoltech.ru/en/research/events/toward-therapies-of-the-future/

 

The Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) is a private graduate research university in Skolkovo, Russia, a suburb of Moscow. Established in 2011 in collaboration with MIT, Skoltech educates global leaders in innovation, advance scientific knowledge, and foster new technologies to address critical issues facing Russia and the world. Applying international research and educational models, the university integrates the best Russian scientific traditions with twenty-first century entrepreneurship and innovation.

 

Science Drive: Russian talent to work in UK with Nobel laureate Andre Geim

Postdocs – get ready to Vroom. Science Drive is here.

The new  program is aimed at supporting the professional development and research initiatives of talented young Russian scientists. For the program’s first year, an expert panel will choose a shortlist of seven researchers specialized in experimental condensed matter physics. Two winners will travel to Manchester where they will work for two years under the leadership of renowned physicist sir Andre Geim – then return to Moscow to work at Skoltech. 

The university’s Center for #Quantum Materials along with Skolkovo Open University (OpUS) will manage the application and selection process, which began yesterday. 

Key dates and timeline:

May 26, 2014 ( 11:00 Moscow time ) – Candidates’ application deadline.
May 28, 2014 – Announcement of seven finalists .
June 1, 2014 ( 11:00 Moscow time ) – Deadline for submission of presentations by finalists.
1-3 June 2014 – Personal interview (or Skype interviews) with members of the Expert Council.
June 3, 2014 – Announcement of two winners.
June – August 2014 – Paperwork and UK visas.
September 1, 2014 – Beginning of work on research project at the University of Manchester.

Professor Andre Geim is the first ever scientist to have won both the Nobel prize – for his groundbreaking work on Graphene – and Ig Nobel, for using magnets to levitate a frog. That’s right: he actually made a frog float midair.

Think you’re a high flyer too? Start by reading here about the possibilities – and requirements.

After you’ve read and understood all relevant information, please send your application to: 

Professor Andre Geim. Photo credit: Scientific Russia

Professor Andre Geim. Photo credit: Scientific Russia

 

 

 

 

 

* The Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) is a private graduate research university in Skolkovo, Russia, a suburb of Moscow. Established in 2011 in collaboration with MIT, Skoltech educates global leaders in innovation, advance scientific knowledge, and foster new technologies to address critical issues facing Russia and the world. Applying international research and educational models, the university integrates the best Russian scientific traditions with twenty-first century entrepreneurship and innovation.

Meet the American Scientist who says the Key to Defeating Malaria could be found in Russia 

When Sidney Altman walks into the gilded lobby of Hotel Ukraine in central Moscow, the question seems inevitable: Could current political tensions destroy scientific relations that took years to build? The American scientist visiting the Russian capital for the first time does not take long to answer.

“They might, but they should not. Politics cannot be allowed to intrude on science and research. We must not let that happen”, says the Yale professor when we meet for a short chat ahead of his seminar at Skoltech. “I see myself part of this project and my commitment has not changed because of international tensions.” In fact, he adds, he currently contemplates deepening his relationships with Russian researchers working an institute in Novosibirsk.

Perhaps at the age of 75 Altman, one of America’s most eminent molecular biologists, can pursue unorthodox ideas without worrying too much about repercussions. Perhaps that is exactly the attitude which won him a Nobel Prize in chemistry for the discovery of catalytic properties of RNA. And perhaps that is what happens when a veteran researcher who won the Nobel prize decides to give humanity a gift of unmeasured value: eradicating malaria.

To make good on a vision of saving millions of lives he needs to convince the world that the blockbuster drugs currently marketed by pharmaceutical companies will pale in comparison to his unique solution. Altman and his team suggest that large nucleic acid molecules can easily bind to the RNA of the parasite that causes malaria and debilitate it. “It might be quite easy, easier than what most people think”, the science man coolly describes his quest to destroy a disease that claims the lives of more than half a million people a year.

The prestige he enjoys as a Nobel laureate buys him respect worldwide. People listen. Researchers, students, journalists, even the representatives of drug companies, are attentive when he speaks. And he does, whenever and wherever he can.

“It is working in the lab. We can stop the growth and development of various strains of malaria that are resistant to all the drugs we have today.” He enthuses when he speaks of a new age of antibiotics.

So what stands between him and becoming a 21st century Louis Pasteur? Funding, or rather, lack thereof. Funding is the other crucial part of the equation.

“The problem is the big pharmaceutical companies, relying on small molecules and their derivatives for treatment. They were not very successful so far. But they would not develop a new big-molecule solution, because it costs them too much money to try out. It is inexcusable. But perhaps if I could find a million dollars to repeat the initial results my team found with mice, then we would stand a chance of persuading pharmaceutical companies to invest.”

Enter the Russian government. It granted an estimated 90 million rubles (2.5 million dollars) to the researchers Altman is associated with at the Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine in Novosibirsk.

“I think it’d be ideal to start my effort in Russia. Russian pharmaceutical companies have never been on par with Europe and America in terms of developing drugs. But because of that, there is a potential and an opportunity here. New antibiotics can be tested and developed in Russia and the process would even be less expensive. I am sure it can be done here. And that is what matters: find a solution.”

photo

Sidney Altman in Moscow, 11.05.2104. Photo: Ilan Goren

3 things you want to know about Sidney Altman

  • Growing up in Montreal, Canada, he used to be a hockey player and a fan of the game. Not anymore. “Professional hockey now is a much rougher game. The finesse and beauty have disappeared from the upper levels. It’s not the same game as it was in the 1960’s and 1970’s when big Russian players like Vladislav Tretiak and Valeri Kharlamov ruled the rinks”.

  • He studied Russian for two years so he could read the great masters of prose and poetry: “Pushkin, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky. I read them all, in Russian.”

  • His only word of advice to students boils down to two words: “Hard work. You cannot work with any concept of public recognition, fame, money and all that. That’s a terrible curse. You have to focus on the science and the problems you’re trying to solve.”

* The Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) is a private graduate research university in Skolkovo, Russia, a suburb of Moscow. Established in 2011 in collaboration with MIT, Skoltech educates global leaders in innovation, advance scientific knowledge, and foster new technologies to address critical issues facing Russia and the world. Applying international research and educational models, the university integrates the best Russian scientific traditions with twenty-first century entrepreneurship and innovation.

Seminar May 12: Nobel Laureate takes on “Superbugs”

Prof Sidney Altman has years’ worth of experience fighting “super-bugs”,

or antibiotic-resistant bacteria. On May 12 the Nobel laureate will come to Skoltech and share his insights into humanity’s biological nemesis – and how to stop it.

The seminar, titled «ANTIBIOTICS: PRESENT AND FUTURE», will present the need for new antibiotics which make use of an enzyme found in all cells that have a catalytic RNA sub-unit.
We’re honored to host this esteemed researcher from Yale University.

Registration required – please write by May 11 to:  abaimova@skolkovotech.ru

The talk will be given in English

May 12, 2014

14.30 – 16.00
Beijing-1 Auditorium, China cluster
Skolkovo School of Management

SEMINAR ABSTRACT:

There is an immediate need for new antibiotics as the prevalence of resistance to drugs is increasing worldwide and is a major cause of deaths among infected individuals.  A new antibiotic, useful against bacterial infections and malaria, makes use of an enzyme found in all cells that has a catalytic RNA subunit. The new antibiotic is much larger than those currently used and it can be a powerful therapy. Consequently, the pharmaceutical industry should change its view of making new drugs.

SPEAKER INTRODUCTION:

Prof Sidney Altman got the Nobel Prize jointly with Thomas R. Chech in Chemistry in 1989 for their discovery of catalytic properties of RNA.

He was born in Montreal, Canada, 1939.

His education includes:  B.S. MIT 1960, Physics; Ph.D. University of Colorado 1967, Biophysics; Postdoctoral fellow with M. Meselson

Professor Sidney Altman. Photo credit: Russian Academy of Sciences

Professor Sidney Altman. Photo credit: Russian Academy of Sciences

, Harvard University and S. Brenner and F. Crick, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK.

From 1985 till 1989 Professor Altman worked as Dean of Yale College. Since 1971 he has be working in Yale University.

The main research interests of Prof Altman include:  Molecular genetics of tRNA biosynthesis and the study of a catalytic RNA in both bacteria and human cells in tissue culture.

http://www.alhimikov.net/laureat/Altman.html

http://www.physchem.chimfak.rsu.ru/Source/History/Persones/Altman.html

http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CE%EB%F2%EC%E5%ED,_%D1%E8%E4%ED%E5%E9

 

* The Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) is a private graduate research university in Skolkovo, Russia, a suburb of Moscow. Established in 2011 in collaboration with MIT, Skoltech educates global leaders in innovation, advance scientific knowledge, and foster new technologies to address critical issues facing Russia and the world. Applying international research and educational models, the university integrates the best Russian scientific traditions with twenty-first century entrepreneurship and innovation.

 

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