Colloquium: Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

MoS2, the most common metal dichalcogenide, adopts a layered structure. A growing number of new materials is utilized to produce 2D semiconductors. Image courtesy of WIkipedia

MoS2, the most common metal dichalcogenide, adopts a layered structure. A growing number of new materials is utilized to produce 2D semiconductors. Image courtesy of WIkipedia

We are pleased to invite you to the Skoltech Colloquium, with guest speaker Prof. Thomas Mueller. And this week: the promise and challenge of two dimensional semiconductors.

When: November 13, 4 pm

What: Optoelectronics with 2D semiconductors

Where: Hypercube, 7th floor

Guest Speaker: Prof. Thomas Mueller. Vienna University of Technology and the Institute of Photonics, Vienna, Austria

Abstract: Two-dimensional (2D) atomic crystals, such as graphene and layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, are currently receiving a lot of attention for applications in (opto-)electronics. In this talk I will review our research activities on photovoltaic energy conversion and photodetection in 2D semiconductors.

In particular, I will present a WSe2 monolayer p-n junction [1], formed by electrostatic doping using a pair of split gate electrodes, and a MoS2/WSe2 van der Waals type-II heterojunction [2]. Upon optical illumination, conversion of light into electrical energy occurs in both devices. I will present measurements of the electrical characteristics, the photovoltaic properties, and the gate voltage dependence of the photoresponse. In the second part of my talk, I will discuss photoconductivity studies of MoS2 field-effect transistors [3].

Professor Thomas Mueller TU Vienna

Professor Thomas Mueller TU Vienna

We identify photovoltaic and photoconductive effects, which both show strong photoconductive gain. A model will be presented that reproduces our experimental findings, such as the dependence on optical power and gate voltage. We envision that the efficient photon conversion, combined with the advantages of 2D semiconductors, such as flexibility, high mechanical stability and low costs of production, could lead to new optoelectronic technologies.

* The Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech) is a private graduate research university in Skolkovo, Russia, a suburb of Moscow. Established in 2011 in collaboration with MIT, Skoltech educates global leaders in innovation, advances scientific knowledge, and fosters new technologies to address critical issues facing Russia and the world. Applying international research and educational models, the university integrates the best Russian scientific traditions with twenty-first century entrepreneurship and innovation.

If you like to participate and for further information or questions, please Liliya Abaimova
We look forward to seeing you.

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