Seminar: Nanomaterials For Industrial Applications: Theory Contributions To Heterogeneous Catalysis, Gas Separation And Storage

Nanomaterials are increasingly used by various industries. Image courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory

Nanomaterials are increasingly used by various industries. Image courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory

How can researchers support industry by designing new nanometer-sized materials with outstanding features?

Join us as we host Dr. Andreas Hauser for a seminar titled “Nanomaterials For Industrial Applications: Theory Contributions To Heterogeneous Catalysis, Gas Separation And Storage”

When: November 20, 2014; 13.30 – 15.00

Where: Russian Quantum Center Auditorium, Ural building (-1 floor), Moscow School of Management

SEMINAR ABSTRACT

The properties of molecular structures in the nanometer range and below vary significantly with system size. Though difficult to predict and far from the asymptotic bulk properties, these fluctuations leave a lot of freedom for the design of novel materials with outstanding features.

This talk focuses on the application of electronic structure theory to a selection of topical problems such as membranes for chiral resolution of drug molecules or the separation and storage of gases, and the usage of subnanometer-sized metal particles for heterogeneous catalysis.

Special focus is given to bimetallic alloys for the dehydrogenation of “light end alkanes”, which could open a potential pathway to efficient alkane metathesis and oligomerization reactions.

Their relevance in the context of renewable energies as well as petroleum industries is discussed. Potential projects and their embedding into teaching concepts are suggested to stimulate an open discussion.

Dr. Andreas Hauser, guest speaker at the Skoltech seminar

Dr. Andreas Hauser, guest speaker at the Skoltech seminar

SPEAKER INTRODUCTION

Dr. Andreas Hauser is a physicist working in the field of theoretical chemistry and was recently employed at UC Berkeley as a joint postdoc in the groups of Prof. Martin Head-Gordon (Theoretical Chemistry) and Prof. Alex T. Bell (Biomolecular and Chemical Engineering).

During his stay he participated in the XC2 initiative, a research project of British Petrol on Light Ends Upgrading, Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis, Biomass Deoxygenation and Oxygenate Coupling.

Previous postdoctoral research in the group of Prof. Peter Schwerdtfeger was concerned with the application of nanoporous membranes to various problems of gas separation and storage.

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